Carly Malcolm

Carly Malcolm earned her B.S. in language and international health at Clemson University. Image Credit: Courtesy of Carly Malcolm

May 2020 graduate Carly Malcolm has been awarded the Algernon Sydney Sullivan Student Award at Clemson University.

Malcolm was chosen for this prestigious award by demonstrating Sullivan’s ideals of heart, mind and conduct as evidenced by “generous and unselfish service to others.”

Each year, the Sullivan Student Award is presented to graduating seniors at more than 70 colleges and universities across the southern United States in honor of its namesake, Algernon Sydney Sullivan, a Southerner who found success as a lawyer, businessman and philanthropist in New York in the late 19th century. An additional Sullivan Award is presented to a member of Clemson’s faculty or staff.

Malcolm majored in language and international health, an integrated degree program that combines studies in health sciences and a language (Spanish). She minored in gender, sexuality and women’s studies. Both her major and minor programs are offered in the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities.

She came to Clemson University from High Point, North Carolina as one of six National Scholars in 2016. As members of Clemson’s most elite academic merit program, National Scholars receive scholarships that cover tuition, fees and other expenses, in addition to special advising, mentorship and enrichment opportunities, including a funded study abroad trip after their first year.

Malcolm has combined her interests in health policy and gender equity to improve the Clemson community by addressing issues of sexual assault and domestic violence, and the support services for survivors. She has gone above and beyond interest and advocacy, taking action on behalf of others.

“Receiving this award is very meaningful to me because it recognizes the importance of improving resources for survivors of sexual violence at Clemson,” Malcolm said. “I have been honored to work alongside many passionate and talented students and staff who are dedicated to serving this community and making Clemson a safer, more equitable environment for all.”

During her time at Clemson, Malcolm was involved in student government, UNICEF and several Honors College programs. She studied in Stellenbosch, South Africa and visited other cities such as Durban and Johannesburg while she was there. In 2018, Malcolm completed a summer internship with the American Public Health Association in Washington. As part of her major, she also studied in Córdoba, Argentina and completed an internship at a hospital there.

As a senior, Malcolm took part in a yearlong Creative Inquiry undergraduate research project called “Stories of Refuge, Detention and Hospitality.” In the program led by professors Angela Naimou and Joseph Mai, each student met with someone being held at the Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia and listened to personal stories about immigration and becoming a refugee. The students later presented their findings at a symposium.

Malcolm said she is especially proud of the work she has done at Clemson as a member of It’s On Us, a student-led movement to end sexual assault on college campuses, and as an interpersonal violence prevention intern in the Office of Access and Equity. As part of her internship, she raised awareness about issues of consent, sexual assault and bystander intervention, and helped provide educational programming on those topics.

“As an alumna, I will continue to support the movement to improve survivor resources at Clemson and look forward to seeing the progress that will be made,” Malcolm said.

In the coming months, Malcolm will begin a Lead for North Carolina government fellowship. The program run by the School of Government at UNC-Chapel Hill aims to cultivate the next generation of public service leaders.

Malcolm will work with the Register of Deeds office in Guilford County, helping develop a new Community Innovators Lab. She described the project as a creativity incubator for planning, developing and delivering knowledge and resources in her hometown.

Eventually Malcolm plans to pursue a master’s degree in public health.