Four noted women scholars of color will share their experiences as faculty scholars to further conversation and inspire action among graduate students and others in support of social justice and equity in academia at an online panel discussion on Monday, October 26 at noon. Themes will include mentorship, scholarship, networking, and mental health/wellness. Visit bit.ly/CUSisterScholars1 to register.

Dr. Arelis Moore de Peralta is an assistant professor of Spanish and community health. She earned her PhD at Clemson in international family and community studies and her MD at Santo Domingo Autonomous University. She is a medical epidemiologist and social scientist with experience in health disparities research in the United States and Latin America. 

Moore de Peralta, Grant, Outley, Croom

Moore de Peralta, Grant, Outley, Croom

Dr. Keneshia Grant, associate professor of political science at Howard University, earned her PhD in political science and public administration from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Her research focus includes the political impact of Black migration from 1915 to the present, and that is the topic of her book “The Great Migration and the Democratic Party: Black Voters and the Realignment of American Politics in the 20th Center (Temple 2020).

Dr. Corliss Outley is a professor of parks, recreation and tourism management at Clemson and earned her PhD in recreation and natural resources management at Texas A&M University. Her research interests include community-engaged scholarship to improve sociopolitical systems & environments to reduce inequalities; community-based participatory research methods & qualitative data analysis methods; and strengths-based approaches to youth engagement, empowerment & activism for social/system-level changes.

Moderating the panel is Dr. Natasha Croom, associate professor of higher education and student affairs and special advisor to the dean for diversity and inclusive excellence in Clemson’s College of Education. She earned her PhD in educational leadership from Iowa State University. Through the use of critical qualitative methodologies and methods, she centers the experiences of womyn of color faculty and students to uncover how racism, sexism, classism, and other interlocking systems create barriers to success in higher education environments. Through her praxis, Dr. Croom strives to work in and with communities to support the creation of practices and policies constructed from equity-based ideologies.

The event is part of the Narratives of Excellence series cosponsored by GRAD 360°, the Graduate School’s comprehensive professional development program for graduate students and postdocs; the Harvey and Lucinda Gantt Multicultural Center in the division of Inclusion and Equity; and the Department of Community Achievement and Student Empowerment in the Division of Student Affairs. The series aims to increase awareness of the diverse experiences and pathways to success that faculty scholars and industry professionals across intersecting identities have taken in their careers.

“This series was informed by ongoing conversations among graduate students, faculty, staff, and community partners about demystifying pathways for diverse careers,” says Graduate School Assistant Dean for Professional Development and Inclusive Excellence Dr. Tia Dumas. “Often, faculty and industry professionals with graduate degrees have not followed traditional pathways into their careers. Recognizing and sharing these narratives of excellence are essential to preparing our graduate students, faculty, and staff to adapt to a changing landscape of professional opportunities.”

Contact Jodi M. Cox (jodi2@clemson.edu) with questions or for more information.