Jacob Sorber of Clemson University is teaching and conducting research in Botswana this academic year, an opportunity made possible by an award from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program.

Sorber is an associate professor of computer science and a Dean’s Professor of Computer Science in the School of Computing.

Jacob Sorber

Jacob Sorber

Sorber said his work is aimed at developing wearable computers and sensing devices that cost less, need less maintenance, run on energy harvested from the environment, and tolerate failures and disruptions.

While visiting Botho University, he plans to apply his expertise to applications in agriculture, healthcare, and natural resource management, providing low-cost solutions that work well even when communication and power are unreliable.

He said his current efforts specifically include making smart-agriculture techniques affordable to smallholder farmers—a critical and vulnerable segment of many of today’s emerging economies.

“This is an amazing opportunity to advance research, provide expertise abroad and then return to Clemson with new insights I will be able to share with students and colleagues,” he said. “It’s an honor to be part of the Fulbright program, and I am grateful for the opportunity.”

The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.

Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, a record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respected fields.

Sorber is one of more than 800 U.S. citizens who are teaching, conducting research and providing expertise abroad in the 2019-20 academic year as part of the Fulbright program.

Amy Apon, the C. Tycho Howle Director of the School of Computing, said Sorber’s award is a high honor and one that is well-deserved. 

“Dr. Sorber’s service as a Fulbright scholar showcases Clemson’s global impact and enhances our growing reputation for international scholarship, teaching and service,” Apon said. “I offer my whole-hearted congratulations to him.  I look forward to seeing the impact of his work in Botswana.”