From laptop repairs to summer campers, computer science major Cullum Smith has plenty of interesting experiences to add to his résumé — and he’s completing it all before he graduates.

Cullum Smith’s parents purchased their first computer when he was 4 years old, and he’s been glued to one ever since. A student in the Calhoun Honors College, Smith initially chose physics as his major, but he soon went back to his true fascination when he switched to computer science.

Smith puts his expertise to good use as a campus laptop technician for Clemson Computing and Information Technology (CCIT). Laptop support is responsible for software support for all student laptops and can perform hardware diagnosis and repairs as an authorized service center for all laptops recommended for Clemson students. When students experience problems with their laptops, they look to him and his coworkers for advice. He’s one of 60 students on campus who help with approximately 10,000 laptop issues a year.

Smith helps students with everything from setting up wireless capability to software problems — and on the rare occasion, computers that have survived disaster.

“The strangest thing I’ve seen at CCIT,” he said, “is a student who came in with a laptop that was in three pieces.”

During the summer, Smith continued working for the University.  “I was a desk supervisor for a dorm where summer program participants stay,” he explains. “I checked students and summer program participants in and out of their rooms, dealt with any problems that arose and answered any questions they had about the University or the Clemson area.”

From laptops to summer campers, Smith has plenty of interesting experiences to add to his résumé — and he’s completing it all before he graduates. He can also add the Calhoun Honors College, the Alpha Lambda Delta honor society and his interest in operating systems — especially Linux — to the list.

“I love learning new things about computers because I know that so much of our future relies on advances in computer technology,” he said.