The Clemson University College of Education begins its first fall semester after reorganization with nine new faculty members across the three departments that make up the college. College leadership is excited to welcome these faculty members, who will enable student learning and contribute to the planned growth of the college. The new faculty members by department are as follows:

Education and Organizational Leadership Development

Natasha Croom serves as an assistant professor of higher education and student affairs. Using critical theoretical frameworks and qualitative inquiry practices, her scholarship centers the experiences of women of color in analyses of institutional practices and policies related to faculty advancement, student development and intersectional identity development in postsecondary environments. Croom received her Ph.D. in higher education administration and a graduate certificate in applied research methods from Iowa State University. She received her master’s degree in student affairs administration in higher education from Texas A&M University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Kathryn Lee D’Andrea serves as a professor of practice. She has previously served as superintendent of Anderson School District 4 and superintendent of the School District of Pickens County. D’Andrea has experience on numerous state and regional committees and task forces. She has served as coordinator of early childhood and family literacy, director of West Market Family Education Center and assistant superintendent of data and accountability in Anderson School District 5. She began her career as a first grade teacher in Columbus, Georgia. D’Andrea earned a Ph.D. and master’s degree in education leadership from Clemson University and a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Georgia.

Misty Soles teaches both graduate and undergraduate level classes in the college while doing research in the area of athletic leadership. Soles is currently a doctoral student of educational leadership at Clemson University. She received her Doctor of Law degree from the University of Georgia and master’s degrees in history and English from Clemson University. She earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Clemson University.

Rachel Wagner is an assistant professor of higher education and student affairs. Wagner has presented on gender, anti-racist and social justice education at universities around the country. Her research interests include gender issues in higher education; social justice in student affairs; alternative epistemologies, methodologies and representations of knowledge; critical theories; and critical and liberatory pedagogies. Wagner earned a Ph.D. in social justice education from the University of Massachusetts. She earned a master’s degree in education in college personnel and a bachelor’s degree in American studies from the University of Dayton.

Education and Human Development

Abigail Allen is an assistant professor of special education. Her research interests include early writing assessment and intervention, language development, curriculum-based measurement and technology in preservice teacher education. Allen received her Ph.D. in special education with an emphasis in learning disabilities from the University of Missouri. She received a master’s degree in education from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education and a master’s degree in communication sciences and disorders from Saint Louis University. She received a bachelor’s degree in speech and hearing science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Shanna Hirsch teaches courses on emotional behavioral disorders and intensive behavior management. She has previously worked as a special education teacher and behavior analyst in Boston, Nashville and Washington, D.C. Her expertise includes the development of supports for students with or at risk for emotional behavioral disorders and the implementation of positive behavior supports. Hirsch received her Ph.D. in special education from the University of Virginia and a master’s degree in special education from Vanderbilt University.

Kent Parker serves as a clinical assistant professor of special education. His areas of expertise include curriculum and instruction for students with severe disabilities, behavior analysis, instructional and school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports, and secondary special education transition planning and services. He has been employed as a special education teacher in three states and has spent more than a decade as a district-level coordinator for behavioral intervention services and autism. Parker received his Ph.D. in special education from the University of Missouri.

Tiffany Rogers serves as a lecturer in the counselor education program. Rogers has worked in the fields of victim advocacy, addictions, college counseling and adolescent inpatient treatment. Her research interests include young adult self-efficacy, social justice and advocacy, feminism, and intimate partner violence. She completed her Ph.D. in counselor education at the University of South Carolina and received both her master’s degree in counselor education and her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Georgia Southern University. She is a nationally certified counselor.

Teaching and Learning

Carlos Nicholas Gomez serves as an assistant professor of secondary math. His research interests center on issues of mathematics teacher development. Specifically, he focuses on the emotional experiences of teachers as they form their identities as teachers of mathematics. He is also interested in teachers learning to conduct argumentation and developing professional learning communities. Gomez received his Ph.D. from the University of Georgia Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Prior to this he taught mathematics for five years at Winder-Barrow High School in Winder, Georgia.