Message from Dean Wendy York, College of Business

 

To Students, Faculty & Staff:

Even as our nation and Clemson community struggle to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, we need to continue to attack another disease: racism.

We have recently seen on a national level more egregious examples of racism and pervasive injustice directed toward black citizens. There are members in our own community who have expressed pain, fear and anxiety from these events as well as from past incidents.

We must reflect on, and commit to, what we can do to make a more just society and a more inclusive, welcoming and supportive environment for all who attend classes, teach and work at the College of Business. It is a time to learn about each other’s lived experiences, support each other and call out injustice when we see it as we drive a community in pain toward lasting change.

In 2017, the Minority Business Student Association (MBSA) was started by black students in the College of Business  to promote and support all our underrepresented students by giving them a sense of shared community. MBSA strives to recruit, retain and develop diverse leaders while maximizing their in-school success and career potential in business. At our College, we have the opportunity to engage even more deeply with MBSA members to listen and learn. Change comes about by sharing experiences, ideas and solutions and we can benefit by hearing from MBSA and others.

My hope is we can all have these conversations to expand our awareness, leverage our diverse perspectives and work together for positive change. Starting this fall, I will host regular Town Halls, in collaboration with the MBSA, so that I and others can listen and learn from our community. The Town Halls will be open to all students, staff and faculty from the College of Business with the goal of sharing experiences, ideas and solutions to effect positive change.

As I watched George Floyd’s funeral, I am reminded how his tragic death, and the underlying causes, are a source of pain for many. Please know that the University and I stand ready to provide what support we can during these challenging times.

With great respect for every member of our community,

Wendy York

Dean

College of Business

 

Please see the following message from the leadership of the Minority Business Student Association (MBSA)

 

 

Minority Business Student Association

at Clemson University

 

To Clemson University and the College of Business:

First and foremost, MBSA will not stand for racism, discrimination, prejudices, or police brutality within our Clemson Community, nor on a global scale. Though we have endured the losses of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and others in recent months, they represent only a small portion of our brothers and sisters who have fallen victim to a system that was initially designed for their demise. The inequalities faced by those with darker skin in this country have plagued our history for too long, and it is with heavy hearts that in our lifetime we experience some of the same injustices that have been imposed on our parents and grandparents.

As we have had time to reflect on the recent events, it is disheartening to realize that Clemson University has not been at the forefront of addressing the inequalities that its students have faced on or around its campus. From “Black Face” parties, to cyber-attacks against the Muslim Association, to offensive sign posting toward marginalized groups, Clemson has yet to show that we are walking in line with the aspirations of a “Better America for Tomorrow.”

Moving forward, it is imperative that we all look within ourselves, and not make excuses for the injustices and/or inequalities that plague our world; we must instead be a part of the solution. It is important to MBSA that students of color have a voice within the College of Business, as well as the University as a whole. MBSA was founded on the need for minority students to feel a sense of belonging within the College of Business, and to enhance the quality of life for students of color on Clemson’s campus. Protests and anger are  products of the marginalized, but the challenge MBSA has for students, faculty, staff and administration alike, is what will be done to improve campus life for minorities once everything subsides? This is a question that we must all ask ourselves in the coming months as we strive to maximize the career potential of our students.

Very Respectfully,

 

Cameron Blassingame, President

Jada McBride, Vice President of Finance

Angela DiMascio, Vice President of Corporate Relations

Chase Jackson, Vice President of Alumni Relations

Jordan Mann, Vice President of Student Engagement

Sebastian Thomas, Vice President of Marketing

Zandhreas Morrow, Secretary