Check out “Whys and Wows: 11 fun facts about total solar eclipses” – and afterward, you’ll be able to astound your family, friends and neighbhors with your eclipse expertise.

CLICK HERE to check out “Whys and Wows: 11 fun facts about total solar eclipses” – and afterward, you’ll be able to astound your family, friends and neighbors with your eclipse expertise.

The “Great American Eclipse” – the first total solar eclipse to stretch across the entire contiguous United States since 1918 – is set to occur on Aug. 21. Everyone in the U.S. will be in position to observe the moon partially cover the sun. But those located within the path of totality will experience the greatest view of all: 100 percent coverage of the sun. Being almost dead-center in the path of totality, viewers in Clemson, South Carolina, are in one of the best viewing spots in the country. Our totality begins at 2:37 p.m. and will last for, coincidentally, 2 minutes and 37 seconds.

Has the buzz surrounding the eclipse caused you to rack your brain to remember just how total solar eclipses come to be? The tilt and rotation of the earth, the phases of the moon, and the alignment of the earth, moon and sun are all factors that play a role. Many of us haven’t studied this since our middle school days.

Well, here’s your chance to refresh your memory. And don’t forget to visit our Eclipse Over Clemson webpage for updates about Clemson University’s mega-viewing event on Aug. 21.