Imagine being about to email your house plans to a local fabricator who will then cut out the interlocking pieces. The plyboard pieces are then loaded into the back of your truck and driven to the site of your home. Then, like a jigsaw puzzle, you assemble the pieces, your house rising from the ground.

No nails used. No saws necessary. No triple checking that measurement before cutting. All the work has already been done. You just have to put it together. You just have to put it together using the newly-designed system called Sim[PLY].

While it might seem far-fetched, a group of Clemson students and professors have spent the last two years designing and building a three-bedroom, low-environmental-impact, net-zero, solar home — called Indigo Pine — that does just that. And it has a very distinctive Southern feel — front porch included.

“The design and construction of a zero-energy home – especially a livable, affordable, accessible, customizable, market-rate, family home – has more potential than any other project imaginable to make a positive difference in the world and for South Carolina families,” said Kate Schwennsen, director of the School of Architecture.

This week, the team is in Southern California competing in the Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon. They are the only team that built their home from the ground up. Let’s take a look at what’s been written already and what’s happening in California.

Read more details about Indigo Pine

Follow the team’s progress

A group of Clemson students and professors have spent the last two years designing and building a three-bedroom, low-environmental-impact, net-zero, solar home — called Indigo Pine — that is put together like a jigsaw puzzle. Check it out!

A group of Clemson students and professors have spent the last two years designing and building a three-bedroom, low-environmental-impact, net-zero, solar home — called Indigo Pine — that is put together like a jigsaw puzzle. Check it out!

A group of Clemson students and professors have spent the last two years designing and building a three-bedroom, low-environmental-impact, net-zero, solar home — called Indigo Pine — that is put together like a jigsaw puzzle. Check it out!