CLEMSON — Members of Delta Alpha Pi (DAPi), an honor society for students with disabilities, recently recognized Clemson University faculty members Paul Anderson and Marianne Herr Glaser as the 2016 Extraordinary Educator Award recipients.

Senior Lecturer Marianne Glaser and Paul Anderson, PhD, both received a 2016 Extraordinary Educator Award from members of the Delta Alpha Pi International Honor Society’s Nu Chapter with Clemson University.

Senior Lecturer Marianne Glaser and Paul Anderson, PhD, both received a 2016 Extraordinary Educator Award from members of the Delta Alpha Pi International Honor Society’s Nu Chapter with Clemson University.

Anderson, associate professor of history in the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities, came to Clemson in 2000. Prior to that, he taught at the University of Mississippi and the University of Alabama-Birmingham. He teaches courses in 19th century U.S. history, including classes on the South to 1865 and the Civil War era.

From day one, according to his nominator, he never acted as though his student needed to be treated differently because of her disability. When the student asked him why there was no “disability statement” on his syllabus, Anderson responded: “We will take care of whatever you need for you to have a fair shot in this classroom. But you are not a disabled student.”

As senior lecturer in communication studies, Glaser teaches Public Speaking, Introduction to Human Communication, Multimodal Communications and Architecture Communication.

Her nomination for the 2016 Extraordinary Educator Award comes as no surprise as she has been working closely with Student Disability Services for several years. She has worked closely with its staff to ensure that students with disabilities receive course content through multiple means and have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge with the same approach. On several occasions, Glaser has worked with team members to explore alternate testing formats, assistive technology and presentation styles.

According to her nominator, Glaser is “one of the most amazing professors … When I was a freshman, trying to adjust to college, she was very nervous having the first deaf blind college student in her class. She was very helpful giving accommodations for exams as well as personally teaching me how to introduce myself to professors, explaining to them my disabilities. She has given me ample, beneficial advice helping me improve in her public speaking class.”

The selection process for the award is left solely to the students in Delta Alpha Pi. The honor society at Clemson conceived of the Extraordinary Educator Award in 2010 to recognize faculty who create a welcoming classroom climate, provide clear expectations and timely feedback, explore ways to incorporate natural supports for learning, use a variety of instructional methods, use technology to enhance learning opportunities and encourage student-faculty dialogue.

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