CLEMSON — A pair of trauma kits designed to control severe bleeding have been installed in both Hendrix Student Center and Robert M. Cooper Library on the Clemson University campus. The kits were purchased through Clemson Undergraduate Student Government (CUSG) funding and installed in early August.

Capt. Bill Shivar of Fire and Emergency Medical Services and Lt. Chris Harrington of the Clemson University Police Department helped facilitate the project with CUSG Chief of Staff Emma Hume. More kits are expected to be installed soon in Brackett Hall, the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts, Fike Recreation Center and Tillman Hall.

(L-R) Capt. Bill Shivar, Lt. Chris Harrington, Trevor Newton and Emma Hume open a newly installed trauma kit in Hendrix Student Center.

Capt. Bill Shivar (left), Lt. Chris Harrington, Trevor Newton and Emma Hume open a newly installed trauma kit in Hendrix Student Center.
Image Credit: Clemson University Relations

“We’ve looked for opportunities like this for some time so that we can be at the forefront of campus safety,” said Harrington, who has helped spearhead active shooter training for more than 3,000 members of the campus community since the fall of 2015. “We are among a small group of universities across the country that have delved into this.”

Shivar said the installation of trauma kits has direct ties to the Stop the Bleed campaign launched by the Department of Homeland Security a couple of years ago.

“One of the recognized causes of death is uncontrolled hemorrhaging or severe bleeding sustained from a shooting or active hostile event,” he said. “These kits are intended for building occupants to render themselves or others with hemorrhage control while waiting on first responders to provide treatment.”

In addition to the massive bleeding components located in each kit, the storage cabinets are alarmed for tamper-resistance.

“The awesome things about these kits are you don’t need any training to use them,” Hume said. “This gives you an ability to save a life from a massive bleeding incident, which is critically important as it relates to campus safety.”

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