The College of Social, Behavioral and Health Sciences named psychology professor Eric Muth associate dean for research and graduate studies and parks, recreation and tourism management professor Denise Anderson associate dean for undergraduate studies.

The College of Social, Behavioral and Health Sciences named psychology professor Eric Muth associate dean for research and graduate studies and parks, recreation and tourism management professor Denise Anderson associate dean for undergraduate studies.

CLEMSON — In anticipation of the Clemson University College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences’ official start on July 1, the college has tapped two veteran Clemson professors to lead its research and academic efforts.

Psychology professor Eric Muth has been named associate dean for research and graduate studies; and parks, recreation and tourism management professor Denise Anderson will serve as associate dean for undergraduate studies.

Both will begin work on the transition during the spring semester to prepare for the launch of the college, which will be composed the departments of communication studies; parks, recreation and tourism management; political science; psychology; public health sciences; sociology and anthropology; youth, family and community studies; and the School of Nursing.

“Dr. Muth and Dr. Anderson possess expertise and experience that will help shape this new college,” said Clemson College of Health, Education and Human Development Interim Dean Brett Wright, who is helping direct the transition. “With their leadership, the college will be well-positioned to be a national and international leader in solving the problems faced by individuals, families, communities and societies.”

Muth will work in the areas of research and graduate programs, leading efforts to increase research focus and capabilities, enhance graduate programs with special emphasis on doctoral programs and expand outreach connections.

On the Clemson faculty since 2000, Muth is also director of Clemson’s Human Factors Research Institute, which focuses on understanding interactions among humans and other elements of a system. He has also served as interim associate dean for research for Clemson’s College of Business and Behavioral Science.

Muth’s research interests include the effects of workload stress on physiology and performance; understanding eating behavior and developing weight loss and maintenance interventions; and understanding the physiology and prevention of motion sickness. He holds Master of Science and doctoral degrees in psychology from Penn State University and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Hartwick College. Before coming to Clemson, Muth served as an aerospace experimental psychologist at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory.

As associate dean for undergraduate studies, Anderson will work in the areas of undergraduate programs and student engagement, giving leadership to efforts to enhance undergraduate degree programs and expand outreach and student placements.

Anderson has been on the PRTM faculty since 2003. From 2009 until 2015, she also served as the department’s graduate coordinator. She is one of two inaugural Presidential Faculty Fellows, charged with offering faculty input to Clemson President James P. Clements on university issues, decisions and direction; and she has served on the Faculty Senate, President’s Commission on the Status of Women and numerous university committees.

Anderson’s major research interests involve youth development, youth sport, leisure education and student development, and girls’ and women’s access to recreation opportunities. Prior to coming to Clemson, she served on the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Illinois Wesleyan University, a master’s in physical education from Eastern Illinois University and a Ph.D. in leisure behavior from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

The creation of the new College of Behavioral, Social and Health Sciences is part of a university-wide academic college reorganization stemming from the university’s Clemson Forward strategic plan. A key enabler to the strategic plan’s success, the reorganization is designed to give each department and school a more strategic path to national prominence.

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