CLEMSON — A gift from California-based Ozen Engineering Inc. to Clemson University is enabling researchers to create detailed computer models of the human body, which can be used to explore a variety of issues, from improving hip replacements to making more comfortable car seating.

Ozen Engineering Inc. has donated a package of software, training and support to researchers in Clemson’s mechanical engineering department. The AnyBody Modeling System allows researchers to create computer models of the human musculoskeletal system that measures internal body forces during daily activities, such as walking, running, standing and sitting. The donation also includes Any2Ans, a software developed by Ozen Engineering Inc. that enables results from the AnyBody System to be streamlined into ANSYS, which can evaluate the stresses and strains on bones and joints during activity.

Mica Grujicic, the Wilfred P. and Helen S. Tiencken Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Clemson, is working with researchers at Ozen to use the software to develop computer-aided tools for the prediction and assessment of the performance and longevity of various implants, such as hip replacements.

“These tools can be used to complement pre-clinical implant evaluation tests so we can determine realistic loading conditions associated with active daily living, conditions that are not generally covered in laboratory pre-clinical evaluation tests,” Grujicic said.

Grujicic also is using the software to research seating comfort and fatigue, such as long-distance driving fatigue. This research can be used to design home and office chairs, wheelchairs and car seating to improve comfort and ergonomic quality.

“Currently the development of new, more-comfortable seats is based almost entirely on legacy knowledge and extensive, time-consuming and costly prototyping and experimental/field testing,” said Grujicic. “This should speed things up considerably.”

Ozen Engineering Inc. works with companies worldwide to optimize product-design performance and improve product-development processes through simulation and realistic computer modeling. In 2008, Ozen Engineering Inc. became a partner company of the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research.

“Ozen Engineering Inc. is committed to supporting cutting-edge research with industry-leading technologies,” said David Wagner, project manager for Ozen Engineering Inc. “We hope this donation will continue to develop the already exemplary capabilities demonstrated by Clemson faculty and researchers.”

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