Parimal Saraf (left) is one of the graduate students conducting research in Clemson's Real-Time Power and Intelligent Systems (RTPIS) Laboratory. The new lab is part of the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering within Clemson’s College of Engineering and Science.

Parimal Saraf (left) is one of the graduate students conducting research in Clemson’s Real-Time Power and Intelligent Systems (RTPIS) Laboratory. The new lab is part of the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering within Clemson’s College of Engineering and Science.

CLEMSON — With the opening of the Real-Time Power and Intelligent Systems Laboratory, Clemson University will be in a position to better prepare the electrical power industry workforce of the future.

The new lab, part of the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in Clemson’s College of Engineering and Science, officially opened Thursday.

Under the direction of G. Kumar Venayagamoorthy, Duke Energy Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the lab is a world-class research, education and innovation-ecosystem laboratory for smart grid technologies. Electrical and computer engineering scholars and researchers can now conduct realistic, real-time investigations of the effects of integrating new ways of generating power, such as wind and solar; distributed generation; plug-in electric vehicles and energy storage; and disturbances on power systems.

Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, along with industry partners Duke Energy, NEC Labs America and several others, the lab creates an opportunity for academic institutions to collaborate with other stakeholders to expand their graduate and undergraduate engineering curricula in electric grid dynamics and operations, system of systems, modeling and simulation, control and smart grid data analytics and visualizations.

Smart grid research being conducted in the Real-Time Power and Intelligent Systems Laboratory includes adaptive devices and intelligent circuits and systems, big data analytics and visualization, computational methods and high-performance computing platforms, cyberphysical systems and cybersecurity, distributed generation and renewable energy, hardware/software-in-the-loop simulation, microgrids and nanogrids, plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles, power electronics and power system computations.

“We are fortunate indeed to have Dr. Venayagamoorthy leading this effort here at Clemson,” said College of Engineering and Science Dean Anand Gramopadhye. “With his expertise and this advanced lab, our students will have the opportunity to make real contributions to smart grid technologies.”

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