Lamont Flowers (left) reads to schoolchildren as part of his work as executive director of the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education. Flowers moderated a panel about the academic achievement of African-American males, and is featured to two recent national publications.

Lamont Flowers (left) reads to schoolchildren as part of his work as executive director of the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education. Flowers moderated a panel about the academic achievement of African-American males, and is featured to two recent national publications.
Image Credit: Contributed

CLEMSON — Lamont A. Flowers, executive director of the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education, moderated a research panel at the Black Male Symposium, held Feb. 28 at Claflin University in Orangeburg.

Flowers moderated a panel comprised of educational researchers that highlighted critical issues from the research literature concerning the academic achievement of African-American males.

Teachers, school leaders, student affairs professionals, higher education administrators, parents and students attended the symposium, designed to provide African-American male high school and college students with information to support their academic achievement and social development.

“I was happy to collaborate with Claflin University on this purposeful endeavor in light of the importance of developing strategies to support African-American male achievement in South Carolina and throughout the United States,” Flowers said.

In other news, Flowers was featured in the Feb. 13 issue of Diverse Issues in Higher Education and co-authored an article in a recent issue of the Journal of Faculty Development.

Titled “Five Brothers,” the Diverse Issues in Higher Education article highlighted the work of Flowers and four other leading African-American male scholars, describing their collaborative research and scholarship.

The article outlined how the five academicians from across the nation began a collaborative scholarly network that encouraged each other through graduate school and first teaching positions. Years later, they continue to meet several times a year to discuss issues facing the academy, and they work together to write and edit books and articles and convene symposiums about the plight of African-American males in education, as well as mentor African-Americans seeking careers in academia.

The Journal of Faculty Development article, titled “Supporting the Pathway to the Professoriate: A Descriptive Overview of a Faculty Development Program,” describes Flowers’ work in co-developing the Asa G. Hilliard III and Barbara A. Sizemore Research Institute on African Americans and Education. The research institute, which is in its seventh year of operation, is a mentoring program designed to promote doctoral student development and describe research techniques and career success strategies.

In addition to his work with the Charles H. Houston Center, Flowers is the Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership at Clemson’s Eugene T. Moore School of Education, which also houses the Charles H. Houston Center.

– Mary Pat Kiser ’14