CLEMSON — Clemson University will celebrate its history and honor alumni and members of the extended Clemson Family who live out its tradition of service on Legacy Day from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday.

Clemson University staff members Ron Grant and Janet Bean, as Thomas Green and Anna Calhoun Clemson, will greet Legacy Day visitors.

Clemson University staff members Ron Grant and Janet Bean, as Thomas Green and Anna Calhoun Clemson, will greet Legacy Day visitors.
Image Credit: Ken Scar / Clemson University

The bronze leaves honoring members of the Fort Hill Legacy Society, a poshumous honor for those who have given Clemson University $1 million or more, lie under the trees next to the Calhoun Mansion.

The bronze leaves honoring members of the Fort Hill Legacy Society, a poshumous honor for those who have given Clemson University $1 million or more, lie under the trees next to the Calhoun Mansion.
Image Credit: Ken Scar / Clemson University

Clemson’s Legacy Day was started in 2009 to recognize the fact that Clemson was founded by an act of philanthropy by Anna and Thomas Green Clemson, and service has been an integral part of what the university stands for ever since.

The Clemsons’ memory will be front and center during the celebrations at their Fort Hill home. Tours of the grounds and a scavenger hunt will be featured events, and copies of Mr. and Mrs. Clemsons’ wills will be on display. Students will be invited to “leave their mark” by signing a special Clemson print that will be displayed in the R.M. Cooper Library, and caramel apples and cider will be served.

At 4 p.m., a formal ceremony under the trees will recognize William Brooks Thayer with a bronze leaf dedication and induction into the Fort Hill Legacy Society, a posthumous honor for those who bequeath $1 million or more to the university. The ceremony will be streamed live on ClemsonTV.

Thayer, Class of 1952, served his country as an officer in the Air Force and served his community as a talented agricultural engineer. He established the William B. Thayer ’52 Quasi-Endowment for Excellence, designated for Clemson’s areas of greatest need.

Clemson students and faculty will make presentations about the donors honored previously with each of the other bronze leaves and the legacy they have left at the university.

Legacy Day is one of two events being held in November to celebrate Clemson’s rich history. The first Clemson History in Plain Sight event will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Nov. 14 on Bowman Field. It will feature tours of five notable places on campus, a hot chocolate bar and storytelling by Reserve Officers’ Training Corps cadets, history students and a Clemson graduate who is a descendent of slaves who helped build the first structures on campus.

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