CLEMSON – Clemson University psychology professor James McCubbin was installed as president of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research Saturday at its annual meeting in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada.

James McCubbin

James McCubbin

The academy’s mission is to provide a forum for leaders in behavioral medicine to promote excellence in science, contribute guidance for the direction of the field and serve as a resource for governmental and academic leaders and for the general public.

“The top killers in the U.S. and other industrialized nations are chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease, cancer and diabetes,” McCubbin said. “The risk, expression and clinical course of each of these diseases is directly linked to our behavior, including lifestyle factors related to stress, diet, exercise and sleep patterns.

“This means we have valuable new biobehavioral tools and strategies for prevention and more effective treatment of these diseases and clearer pathways to a more healthy and happy citizenry and a more cost-effective national health care system.”

McCubbin came to Clemson University in 1987 as chair of the psychology department. He served as senior associate dean of the College of Business and Behavioral Science and currently is a faculty scholar in Clemson’s School of Health Research. Before coming to Clemson, he served on the faculty at Duke University Medical Center and the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

He was chair of the National Institutes of Health’s Behavioral Medicine Study Section and other NIH review committees.

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Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research
The Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research was founded in 1978 at a meeting hosted by the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences as an organization of established scientists and thought leaders to guide the developing field of behavioral medicine. Fellows of the academy are distinguished physicians and scientists elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to the field of behavioral medicine.