CLEMSON — The Institute for Parks at Clemson University will recognize five individuals for their exemplary leadership in environmental issues at the George B. Hartzog Jr. Awards Luncheon.

John Seidensticker and Susan Lumpkin will accept the Benton H. Box Award at the George B. Hartzog Awards Luncheon.

John Seidensticker and Susan Lumpkin will accept the Benton H. Box Award at the George B. Hartzog Awards Luncheon.

The awards luncheon will be at noon Sept. 30 at the Madren Conference Center on the Clemson campus. The event will be followed by the Hartzog Lecture, to be given by Keshav Varma, the former director of the World Bank’s Global Tiger Initiative. Open to the public, the lecture will be held at 2 p.m. at the Brooks Center.

The annual luncheon and lecture are named for Hartzog, the seventh director of the National Park Service.

Hartzog Award recipients are:

John Seidensticker and Susan Lumpkin will accept the Benton H. Box Award, presented to an educator who inspires students and encourages curriculum innovation and an environmental ethic. The husband-wife duo is considered among the world’s great conservation couples. A leading tiger conservationist, Seidensticker is head of the Conservation Ecology Center of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. He has worked to study and conserve wild tigers, leopards, giant pandas, sloth bears and other carnivores since the 1960s, and he pioneered the use of radio telemetry to study many species, including wild tigers and leopards. He also served as senior independent adviser to the World Bank’s Global Tiger Initiative, guiding strategy to double the number of wild tigers.

Martha Monroe will receive the William C. Everhart Award at the luncheon.

Martha Monroe will receive the William C. Everhart Award at the luncheon.

Lumpkin has more than 30 years of experience advocating for wildlife conservation through her writing on species from rabbits to giant pandas and tigers. She served 20 years as communications director of the Friends of the National Zoo, and since 2009 she has been the senior writer/editor for the Global Tiger Initiative. The author/editor of 15 books and more than 100 articles on wildlife and conservation, she was chief drafter of the St. Petersburg Declaration on Tiger Conservation, the Global Tiger Recovery Program and the Global Snow Leopard and Ecosystem Protection Plan.

Martha Monroe will receive the William C. Everhart Award, which recognizes sustained achievements that foster an appreciation of natural and cultural heritage. Monroe is an international leader in environmental education research and practice. A professor at the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation, she has investigated formal and informal environmental education and led interdisciplinary efforts exploring the use of wood for energy in the southern wildland-urban interface and the connection between climate change and southern pine production. Monroe also works on research teams exploring environmental perceptions and decision-making, and her work has been published in eight books, 25 book chapters and numerous scholarly articles.

Dave Harmon will receive the Walter T. Cox Award at the George B. Hartzog Jr. Awards Luncheon.

Dave Harmon will receive the Walter T. Cox Award at the George B. Hartzog Jr. Awards Luncheon.

Karen Waldrop will receive the Dwight A. Holder Award at the luncheon.

Karen Waldrop will receive the Dwight A. Holder Award at the luncheon.

Dave Harmon will accept the Walter T. Cox Award, given for exceptional leadership in public service and natural and cultural resource management. Harmon is executive director of the George Wright Society, a professional association of researchers, resource managers, administrators and educators working on behalf of parks, protected areas and cultural sites. He maintains an active research interest in the relationship between biological and cultural diversity, having co-founded Terralingua, a nonprofit devoted to the subject. Harmon has co-edited several volumes on protected-area conservation and is author of “Mirror of America: Literary Encounters with the National Parks” and “In Light of Our Differences: How Diversity in Nature and Culture Makes Us Human.”

Karen Waldrop will receive the Dwight A. Holder Award, which recognizes outstanding work by doctoral graduates or faculty members from Clemson’s School of Agriculture, Forest and Environmental Sciences and the department of parks, recreation and tourism management. Waldrop is the deputy commissioner for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. A 2004 Ph.D. graduate from Clemson, she began her career with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources in 2005 as its first research coordinator, and then served as director of the wildlife division before becoming deputy commissioner. During her educational and professional career, she has worked on a variety of projects focusing on wildlife disease issues, habitat-based forest management and restoration efforts.

Michael A. Allen will receive the Robert G. Stanton Award at the George B. Hartzog Jr. Awards Luncheon.

Michael A. Allen will receive the Robert G. Stanton Award at the George B. Hartzog Jr. Awards Luncheon.

Michael A. Allen will accept the Robert G. Stanton Award, recognizing sustained and innovative achievement in promoting racial or ethnic diversity in the management of North America’s natural, historic and cultural heritage. Allen has served as a park ranger and education specialist and now is the community partnership specialist for the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor/Fort Sumter National Monument and Charles Pinckney National Historic Site operated by the National Park Service. He was instrumental in establishing the corridor in 2006 and the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Commission the following year, and he has been involved in establishing markers, programs and exhibits related to the history of native Africans in the region and U.S.

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About the Institute for Parks
The Institute for Parks at Clemson University provides a comprehensive program of research, education, training and outreach that enhances the management of the world’s parks and protected areas, while increasing the global public’s understanding of the natural, cultural and recreational value of these resources.