CLEMSON – Horses and humans can have a wonderful relationship, but it does take work to keep all concerned cared for and healthy. The Clemson Equine Center is offering Advanced Horse Management, a short course in the Horse Business and Management series.The girls

Open to the public, Advanced Horse Management will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May 17 at the Clemson equine center in Pendleton. The course fee is $100, which includes a course manual and lunch. (Registration form.)

Course instructors are Kristine Vernon, assistant professor in the Animal and Veterinary Sciences (AVS) department and Rebecca Shirley, AVS equine lecturer and Clemson University Equine Center farm manager.

Instructors will cover:

Horse Anatomy and physiology

  • Major body systems – musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, integument, nervous/sensory, endocrine, reproductive (briefly), digestive (briefly)

Hoof Care and Shoeing – the equine foot, diseases

  • Anatomy of the foot/leg
  • Common problems
  • Keeping horses sound

Genetics

  • Basic principles
  • Genetic problems in the industry

Health Care

  • Review of major diseases and biosecurity
  • Advanced parasitology
  • Managing inflammation; recognizing lameness
    • Advanced lameness discussion
  • Stable management principles

Behavior and behavior modification

  • Basic principles
  • Dealing with horses on the ground in different scenarios

Managing the Performance Horse

  • Special considerations
  • Common injuries/problems
  • Stabling and behavioral considerations
  • Managing their stress

Managing young stock

  • Common problems related to young horses
  • Handling/behavioral problems
  • Nutrition

Managing geriatric horses

  • Common problems related to older horses
  • Nutrition
  • Housing/mobility issues

Managing the broodmare

  • Nutrition
  • Housing
  • Exercise

End of Life Decisions

  • Euthanasia options
  • Carcass disposal

“While anyone is welcome to attend the courses, the short-course series is designed for people working as farm managers, trainers, sales representatives and as other equine professionals whose work could be advanced by having a certificate,” Shirley said.

The class is part of the Horse Business and Management certificate program. Participants who attend the courses and take an exit exam earn a certificate of completion from Clemson.

To receive a certificate of completion, seven or more courses must be attended. The required courses for the certificate are:  Basic Horse Management, Advanced Horse Management, Nutrition, Facility Design and Management, and Equine Business Practices.

Optional courses to fulfill the additional two credits are: Reproduction, Exercise Physiology, Horse Judging and Evaluation, and Progressing the Young or Inexperienced Horse.  Participants will be required to take an exit exam as well.

Information, fees and locations for each course will be publicized as details are finalized.

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