George Petersen (far right) engages in conversation with a delegation from the Korean Ministry of Education during its recent visit to the Upstate.

College of Education leadership engages in conversation with a delegation from the Korean Ministry of Education during its recent visit to the Upstate.
Image Credit: Clemson University

A delegation from the Korean Ministry of Education recently met with Clemson University College of Education administrators to learn about the college’s efforts to serve underserved schools and communities and improve graduate rates and student outcomes. The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network coordinated the meeting, which was part of a fact-finding visit for the delegation that included meetings with the U.S. Department of Education, S.C. Department of Education and T. L. Hanna High School in Anderson, South Carolina.

George J. Petersen, founding dean of Clemson’s College of Education, was in attendance along with David E. Barrett, associate dean of academic affairs and research; Suzanne Rosenblith, associate dean for undergraduate programs; and Debi Switzer, professor and chair of the Department of Education and Human Development. According to Petersen, college administration relished the opportunity to learn the similarities and differences between school systems in Korea and the United States.

“We enjoyed hearing about the Korean school system and their service agencies working with families, especially migrant families who come to Korea,” Petersen said. “We learned that a significant majority of students in Korea attend some form of college to the tune of 84 percent of students.”

Petersen said the Korean delegation asked questions about preparing teachers in America and U.S. schools’ abilities to address social issues, primarily dropout prevention rates, early childhood education and students living in poverty. A portion of the meeting was spent discussing college student preparation, while most of the meeting was spent discussing where U.S. and Korea interventions differed.