CLEMSON, South Carolina – Clemson University scientist Donald Liebenberg, who has personally witnessed and researched 26 total solar eclipses over the past 60-plus years, has been prominently featured on MACH, an NBC News international website that focuses on science and technology.

I Chased an Eclipse at 60,000 Feet (and Set a World Record)” focuses on Liebenberg’s amazing journey aboard a Concorde supersonic jet on June 30, 1973.

Clemson University scientist Donald Liebenberg has been prominently featured on MACH, an NBC News international website.

Clemson University scientist Donald Liebenberg has been prominently featured on MACH, an NBC News international website.

Here is a segment from the story:

At 74 minutes, our group aboard the Concorde set a record for the amount of time spent in totality that has never been broken. To say the least, it was an experience I will never forget. Though most people will never witness an eclipse from such a high and fast-moving perch in the sky, I urge you not to miss the one coming this August. Even watching it from the ground will be one of the grandest experiences of your life.

Liebenberg, who has been an adjunct professor in the College of Science’s department of physics and astronomy since 1996, has literally travelled all over the world to enter the path of totality of solar eclipses. He has studied them from the ground, on ships in the middle of oceans, and, of course, in airplanes.

All told, Liebenberg has spent almost three hours in totality, which surpasses anyone who has ever lived.

The upcoming Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse event over Clemson will mark Liebenberg’s 27th eclipse. He has also witnessed several other eclipses that were nearly – but not quite – in the path of totality.

Liebenberg’s adventures are being chronicled on our Eclipse Over Clemson blog.