Lamont A. Flowers, executive director of Clemson University’s Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education

Lamont A. Flowers, executive director of Clemson University’s Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education
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Lamont A. Flowers, executive director of Clemson University’s Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education, has been engaged in speaking and writing initiatives bringing attention to the subject of African-Americans and education in the United States.

Flowers’ book chapter titled “Exploring the Relationship Between Academic Self-Regulation and Educational Outcomes among African-American Male Education Majors” was selected by the editors of Emerald Group Publishing Limited as an Outstanding Author Contribution in the 2014 Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence. The chapter was part of the book Black Male Teachers: Diversifying the United States’ Teacher Workforce.

Flowers co-authored a chapter titled “Exploratory Study of the Factors Affecting the Academic and Career Development of African-American Males in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics” that was published in the book Building on Resilience: Models and Frameworks of Black Male Success Across the P-20 Pipeline. In the chapter, data from African-American male students pursuing degrees in STEM fields were analyzed to develop a framework to promote positive academic and career development outcomes among African-American males in college.

Flowers presented research at the annual Gathering of Leaders sponsored by the Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color in Jackson, Mississippi. The theme of the conference was “Onward and Upward: Advancing the Affirmative Development of Boys and Young Men of Color.” The presentation described ongoing research at the Charles H. Houston Center pertaining to the representation of African-American males in gifted education.

Flowers delivered a session on “Developing Effective Educational Intervention Programs” in conjunction with the annual Continuation of Conversations with Senior Scholars on Advancing Research and Professional Development Related to Black Education. Held as part of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) meeting in Philadelphia, the session included U.S. scholars who study the black experience in education. Flowers also delivered a session on “Plotting the Path to Historically Black Colleges and Universities for School-Age Black Males” at the AERA meeting.

Flowers spoke at the National Council for Black Studies annual conference March 6 in Miami, presenting research regarding African-American science and mathematics students’ career development orientations in college. The research was conducted at the Charles H. Houston Center in conjunction with its National Science Foundation grant-funded project, Advancing Interest and Motivation (AIM) for STEM Careers.

In addition to his work with the Charles H. Houston Center, Flowers is the Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership at Clemson’s Eugene T. Moore School of Education, which houses the Charles H. Houston Center.

The Charles H. Houston Center conducts empirical research, disseminates scholarly information, examines evidence-based best practices, and addresses critical issues impacting African-Americans at all levels of the educational system.

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