Jennifer Counts

Jennifer Counts is currently in her fourth year of doctoral studies in special education.
Image Credit: College of Education

Faculty in Clemson’s education and human development department recently recognized three students as its first doctoral research fellows. The fellowship rewards doctoral students who are leaders among their peers in the area of research.

According to Debi Switzer, chair of the education and human development department, the fellowship is designed to recognize students who have excelled in their area of research and help provide leadership in their program area. The first recipients are Jennifer Counts, Michelle Popham and Kristina Randall.

Michelle Popham

Michelle Popham also is in her fourth year of doctoral studies in special education.
Image Credit: College of Education

“These doctoral students are outstanding in their scholarly productivity and are already being recognized by the profession for the importance and quality of their work,” Switzer said. “They should be proud of what they have achieved and how they set the bar for excellence in their chosen field.”

Counts is currently in her fourth year of doctoral studies in special education. Her research focuses on disproportionality in discipline addressing over represented groups such as males, students of color, students with disabilities and English Language Learners.

Popham also is in her fourth year of doctoral studies in special education. She has led the planning and implementation of a single-case multiple baseline design research study to determine the effects of teaching middle school students with specific learning disabilities a mathematics problem solving strategy using the self-regulated strategy development framework.

Kristina Randall

Kristina Randall is currently in her third year of doctoral studies in special education.
Image Credit: College of Education

Randall is currently in her third year of doctoral studies in special education. Her research interests focus on influencing the impact and adoption of evidence-based practices to support individuals with intellectual disorders and their teachers.

The fellowship carries a one-year award of $1,000 to any stipend or assistantship. Applicants are able to re-apply in subsequent years depending on funding availability.

“These students are enhancing the mission of our department and college with their research,” Switzer said. “Our department has always prioritized serving the needs of a wide range of special education populations, and these students’ research is indicative of how well our department fulfills that priority.”

END