More than 200 professionals and experts from around the globe descended on South Carolina for ‘Fibers Interfacing the World’

Fiber Society dignitaries confer before the recent Fiber Society's Fall Symposium held at the Madren Conference Center on the campus of Clemson University.  (from left to right) Michael Ellison, Fiber Society Co-chair and professor of polymer fibers, Clemson University; Rudolf Hufenus, Fiber Society President and R&D Manager, Polymer & Processing, Advanced Fibers, Empa; Konstantin Kornev, Fiber Society, Co-chair and professor of materials physics, Clemson University; Plenary speaker, Vladimir Tsukruk, Georgia Institute of Technology.

Fiber Society dignitaries confer before the recent Fiber Society’s Fall Symposium held at the Madren Conference Center on the campus of Clemson University. (from left to right) Michael Ellison, Fiber Society Co-chair and professor of polymer fibers, Clemson University; Rudolf Hufenus, Fiber Society President and R&D Manager, Polymer & Processing, Advanced Fibers, Empa; Konstantin Kornev, Fiber Society, Co-chair and professor of materials physics, Clemson University; Plenary speaker, Vladimir Tsukruk, Georgia Institute of Technology.

More than 200 professionals and experts from around the globe descended on South Carolina last month, as Clemson University hosted The Fiber Society’s Fall Symposium.

This year’s conference — “Fibers Interfacing the World” — drew an international contingent that included attendees from the United States, Europe, Asia, and Latin America, representing 16 countries.

The symposium — co-chaired and organized by Clemson professors Dr. Michael Ellison and Dr. Konstantin G. Kornev — covered approximately 20 broad topics, including fiber mechanics, physics, and chemistry, with a focus on interactions of fibrous materials with the broader environment. Four parallel sessions over the three-day conference also showcased natural and synthetic organic fibers, biometrics and bio-inspired materials, inorganic fibers such as ceramic and optical fibers; fibers from carbon nanotubes and grapheme platelets; multifunctional fibers for sensing, actuation, and artificial organs; surface-functionalized, fiber-based materials; and fibers for biomedical applications.

Three plenary speakers opened each day of the symposium, sparking symposium-wide discussions. Dr. Vladimir Tsukruk from the Georgia Institute of Technology [Atlanta, GA] spoke of future developments in fiber science and engineering with a perspective toward biomaterials and spider silk-based nano composites. Dr. Alan Windle from Cambridge University [Cambridge, UK] covered superstring fibers made of carbon nanotubes and grapheme platelets. Dr. Alejandro Rey from McGill University [Montreal, Canada] introduced science-driven engineering of fibers from liquid crystalline polymers.

Yu Gu — a student in Clemson’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering — also won the Fiber Society prize for best graduate student research paper.