CLEMSON – Clemson horticulture students have been busy this spring sharing their knowledge with others in the horticulture industry.

Clemson horticulture students Vincent Galatolo, Elizabeth Elmore, Annie Borlik and Dalton Holzheimer attend the South Carolina Landscape and Turfgrass Association’s Annual Conference and Trade Show in Columbia where they gave presentations about their different internships.

Clemson horticulture students Vincent Galatolo, Elizabeth Elmore, Annie Borlik, Dalton Holzheimer and Justin Revland deliver presentations at the South Carolina Landscape and Turfgrass Association’s Annual Conference and Trade Show in Columbia.
Image Credit: Clemson University

The students engaged in professional activities that included presenting at conferences, to publishing articles, as well serving as horticulture ambassadors. The students were supported in their activities by Ellen Vincent, environmental landscape specialist in the Clemson horticulture program.

“Students who publish, present and engage with the green industry have unique opportunities to showcase their unique skills and passion for the field,” Vincent said. “These real life  experiential learning opportunities are rewarding steps in career development. Engagement between the classroom and the green industry are elements found in most horticulture classes, as in mine.”

The students include Elizabeth Elmore, a senior from Charleston, Vincent Galatolo a senior from Lexington, Annie Borlik a senior from South Bend, Indiana, Justin Revland a senior from Mt. Pleasant and Dalton Holzheimer a senior from Gilbert who participated in internships. They presented their experiences during the South Carolina Landscape and Turfgrass Association’s Annual Conference and Trade Show in Columbia on Jan. 25 to large audiences of green industry professionals.

Jordan Baylor, a Clemson horticulture student from Belton,attended the ISA Conference and Trade Show in Myrtle Beach where she contributed to the student panel on how to encourage greater student participation and involvement in the International Society of Arboriculture organization.

Jordan Baylor, a Clemson horticulture student from Belton, serves as a student ambassador at the ISA Conference and Trade Show in Myrtle Beach. She is seen here holding an Alex Shigo artifact.
Image Credit: Clemson University

Jordan Baylor, a horticulture senior from Belton, was awarded the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Southern Chapter Student Ambassador Award. Baylor received this award when she attended the ISA Conference and Trade Show in Myrtle Beach where she contributed to the student panel on how to encourage greater student participation and involvement in the International Society of Arboriculture organization.

Alexis Anthony, a junior from Fort Mill, received the South Carolina Nursery and Landscape Association’s South Carolina Horticulture Industry Trade Show Intern Scholarship Award. Anthony also attended the South Carolina Horticulture Industry annual conference and trade show as a student worker from Jan. 31 to Feb. 3. In addition, Anthony published an article, SCHI Trade Show Internship, in the South Carolina Nurseryman Magazine.

Revland also received the South Carolina Nursery and Landscape Association’s South Carolina Horticulture Industry Trade Show Intern Scholarship Award. In addition, he also attended the South Carolina Horticulture Industry’s annual conference and trade show as a student worker from Jan. 31 to Feb. 3.

Environmental and Natural Resources student Caroline Sherbert from Greenville published an article in the Winter 2017 edition of the ISA Southern Chapter News titled “HORT 1010: Tree Reflection.”

Also, horticulture students Elmore and Galatolo served as horticulture ambassadors for the Black History Month Plant-A-Seed event organized by La’ Portia Perkins, a Wildlife and Fisheries Biology student, on Feb. 28. About 70 people attended the event and La’ Portia reported that Elmore and Galatolo were “rock stars” at the event that guided first timers to start a seed grown plant to take home and tend.

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