As a Phi Kappa Phi Fellow, Sarah Waldvogel has already begun attending classes at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, where she is pursuing an M.D. and Ph.D.

As a Phi Kappa Phi Fellow, Sarah Waldvogel has already begun attending classes at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, where she is pursuing an M.D. and Ph.D.
Image Credit: Courtesy of Sarah Waldvogel

CLEMSON, South Carolina – Sarah Waldvogel, who received dual bachelor degrees in genetics and biochemistry at Clemson University this past spring, has been selected as a 2018 recipient of the Marcus L. Urann Fellowship by The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

Waldvogel, who was born in Central, South Carolina, is one of only six recipients nationwide to receive the prestigious $15,000 fellowship, named for the Society’s founder. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines.

As a Phi Kappa Phi Fellow, Waldvogel has already begun attending classes at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, where she is pursuing an M.D. and Ph.D.

“I love Baylor so far and am just finishing up my second week,” said Waldvogel, who lived her entire life in the Clemson area before moving to Houston. “I feel very fortunate to have had so much support at Clemson, which made my application possible.”

Waldvogel said that she has long been fascinated by how life happens at the molecular level. As an undergraduate at Clemson, she conducted research in the laboratory of Michael Sehorn, an associate professor in the department of genetics and biochemistry.

“Working in Dr. Sehorn’s lab was one of the most formative experiences of my undergraduate career. It really gave context and practicality to abstract concepts in my classes and truly taught me how to think like a scientist,” Waldvogel said. “I studied the proteins that are involved in DNA double-stranded break repair by homologous recombination, which is an important pathway during normal cell division as well as in many types of cancer.”

“I had the privilege of having Sarah in my research lab and the classroom,” said Michael Sehorn, associate professor in the department of genetics and biochemistry. “She embodies what we all hope our students will become. I am very excited for her as she opens this new chapter in her life at Baylor College of Medicine.”

Since its creation in 1932, the Marcus L. Urann Fellowship Program has become the Society’s signature award, allocating $345,000 annually to deserving students for first-year graduate or professional study. Currently, 51 Fellowships of $5,000 and six of $15,000 are awarded each year.

The selection process for a fellowship is based on the applicant’s evidence of graduate potential, undergraduate academic achievement, service and leadership experience, letters of recommendation, personal statement of educational perspective and career goals, and acceptance in an approved graduate or professional program.

Information from a Phi Kappa Phi press release was used in this report.

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