Clemson University’s Ken Marcus (center) was inducted into the NAI on April 5 in Washington, D.C. Standing with him are founding NAI president Paul Sanberg (left) and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents for the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Clemson University’s Ken Marcus (center) was inducted into the NAI on April 5 in Washington, D.C. Standing with him are founding NAI president Paul Sanberg (left) and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents for the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
Image Credit: Photo courtesy of Ken Marcus

WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Dec. 12, 2017, Clemson chemistry professor R. Kenneth Marcus was named a Fellow to the prestigious National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

On April 11, 2018, he received Congressional Record recognition on the floor of Congress.

U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland read aloud the names of the 155 inventors – including Marcus – who were inducted as the 2017 Fellows.

“This is quite an honor to be recognized by an organization that is growing in prominence and has such outstanding peer Fellows,” said Marcus, University Professor of Chemistry at Clemson. “It is important to note that patents don’t just come from bright ideas; they must be reduced to practice. Graduate students, in my case, are integral to the process.”

The NAI’s induction ceremony was held April 5 in Washington, D.C., during its 2018 annual conference. The NAI title recognizes academic inventors who have made an “impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society” with the inventions they’ve patented.

“Ken is an outstanding faculty member and is well known for his innovative and productive research program,” said Bill Pennington, chair of the department of chemistry. “All of us in our department are very happy to see him get this well-deserved recognition.”

In becoming an NAI Fellow, Marcus joined a class of 912 total NAI Fellows representing more than 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. NAI Fellows include Nobel Prize Laureates, National Medal recipients and members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Marcus is Clemson University’s second NAI Fellow, following in the footsteps of John Ballato, a professor of materials science and engineering, who was elected in 2015.

Nominees must be a named inventor on a patent issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Collectively, NAI Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.